Friday, 21 November 2014

Digital Storytelling tools worth looking at (1)

There is a plethora of tools in the virgin outback of digital storytelling.  This does not make one's life any easier, plus there is the chorus of cellos in the background warning you that most of these tools that you invest time and effort into learning and using may not be around forever, or even for very long.  So what's one to do?  Certainly it shouldn't stop one from playing around and experimenting - particularly with the more common tools that are handy to know anyway (think iMovie / window's movie maker etc.) I'd love to hear comments of what you've used and what has worked for you or your students

Here are a few of the tools I've experimented with personally, or have seen well used during my INF533 Literature in Digital Environments course at CSU (if you're looking for a great course to upskill yourself, I can thoroughly recommend it - you can take it as a single course "just for fun" and it is fun).

Creativist is an example of "scrollitelling".  It's a really low-barrier tool where you can combine pictures and video with a story.  The free version limits the size of your files (150 MB).  DW Academie gives a rather nice guide here which is worth reading through before you try.

https://www.creatavist.com/featured

Inklewriter by Inklestudios is a platform for interactive choice based stories.  It is really easy to get started on and in its simplest version one can just add text.  Photos can be added relatively easily but there is no video option, which is a pity.  I can see great possibilities for use with students who are exploring options for example of subject choice or university or study choices - they could explore options and alternatives in a "safe" and personal environment imagining "what if..."

http://www.inklestudios.com/firstdraft/

Popcorn Webmaker by Mozilla is another easy "plug and play" tool. It uses some of the basic conventions of video editing with various layers (sound, video, picture) and allows one to embed elements in a story.  One of the interesting variations on this is that the interactive element allows the audience to remix the original and make their own stories.

https://urbanstorytellers.makes.org/thimble/MzY3OTE5MTA0/urban-storytelling-a-how-to-guide-start-here

More ideas and lists:

Finally Storygami - something that is unfortunately still in Beta and where one can hire the team to realise your storytelling dreams, but where I see great potential for use in educational settings.